Pre-Conference Workshops Still Open!

Hello 2016 Region 8 Conference goers! We are officially less than one week away from gathering in Seattle for a wonderful few days of networking, sharing of ideas and best practices, exploring current trends and theory in advising, and enjoying the sights and sounds of this beautiful city! Did you know that even though general conference registration has closed, registration for pre-conference sessions is still open? Take a look at the abstracts below, and register to attend one (or more) of these fantastic presentations!

All pre-conference presentations are on January 20th and registration is separate from conference registration. Each pre-conference is $25.00 USD. To register, complete this form and fax it to the NACADA Office at 785-532-7732, or simply call the office at 785-532-5717. You can also sign up for a session in person at the Motif next week if you prefer.  (Note: space is limited and some pre-conferences may not be available for same day registration.)

Pre-Conference Session Abstracts

9:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Advising Administration: Creating a Blueprint for Success

Room: First Hill

Presenters: Dana Zahorik, Ed.D., M.S.E. (Advising Steering Committee and Peer Advising Chair/Academic Counselor, Fox Valley Technical College, NACADA Vice President, 2015-2016),  Jennifer Joslin, PhD (Associate Director for Content Development, NACADA, Kansas State University)

Interested in advising administration but not sure how to begin your journey? Are you a new administrator who would like a road map to meet your professional and personal goals? Are you an experienced administrator who would like to make sure your development is meeting long-term goals? This preconference is designed as a hands-on, interactive workshop that will introduce advising administration competencies in a format that addresses the needs of aspiring advisors, new administrators, and experienced administrators. Participants will review critical definitions and terms; be introduced to key competencies; begin to build a supportive network of like-minded colleagues; and engage in interactive exercises designed to illuminate important concepts. Facilitators are experienced NACADA leaders who have led advising offices or have experience leading from their position on two-year and four-year campuses.

Cost: $25

 

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1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Creating an inclusive and equitable academic advising experience

Room: Pioneer

Presenters: Maria Sefchick-Del Paso (University of Washington) Antaknea Majors (Bellevue College)

Many higher education institutions are working to eliminate the achievement gap among first generation students and students of color. This session will address one way in which academic advisors can increase student success. Based on Critical Race Theory we will address how power, privilege and institutional discrimination impact underserved students in higher education. We will review best practices and strategies for creating an inclusive practice that fosters equity and social justice in academic advising. We will also provide tools to help participants adopt a mindful inclusion approach to academic advising. Presenters will provide time so that participants can draft a list of strategies and/or best practices to implement at their own institutions. This presentation is appropriate for advisors and administrators from both 2 and 4 year colleges.  

Cost: $25

 

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1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Crafting your personal advising/administrative philosophy statement

Room: First Hill/Belltown

Presenters: Susan Poch (Washington State University), Sara Ackerson (Washington State University Vancouver), Michelle McIlvoy (Washington State University Vancouver), Kyle Ross, (Eastern Washington University)

In a career field where vastly different educational backgrounds and experiences are the norm, a personal philosophy statement can be the ultimate “Who am I?” answer for advisors and advising administrators. A fully-developed philosophy statement can provide a common ground for expression of advising practice and theory, and can act as a guide for decision-making. It is also a values-based perspective of an advisor’s identity. In this panel session, the presenters will share their experiences and knowledge about creating a personal philosophy statement, review important components and provide a series of guiding questions for consideration. Participants will have time to draft an opening statement to their own personal philosophy statement and get feedback from colleagues.  

Cost: $25

 

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3:15 – 5:15 p.m.

Conducting academic advising research

Room: First Hill/Belltown

Presenters: Yung Hwa Anna Chow (Washington State University)

An often-heard statement from advising practitioners is “Why doesn’t someone research that advising question?” Why isn’t that “someone” you? This workshop, facilitated by NACADA Research Committee members, will assist individuals who are considering an advising issue to focus their topic and develop a clearly articulated question to guide their inquiry project. Participants will work together and with facilitators to identify appropriate data collection and analysis approaches for their questions, and make a realistic plan to carry out their project. Facilitators will identify NACADA support resources to help participants take the next steps. Come with an advising issue and leave with a viable research question that will lay the groundwork for a successful research study. This workshop is appropriate for individuals at any level of research experience.

Cost: $25

 

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3:15 – 5:15 p.m.

Practice, Reflect, Repeat: Getting Back to Basics to Teach At-Risk College Students the Essential Elements of Persistence

Room: Pioneer

Presenters: Beth Dittman, Willamette College  *Best of Region Winner 2015*

This session explores the basic tools used to help at-risk students to ingrain the skills they need to change unsuccessful behaviors, form new habits, and begin succeeding academically. Attendees will leave the session with a concrete plan to translate the information gained to advising or classroom settings. The core of what works with at-risk students is teaching them to be successful academically by being less academic. Students must be challenged to push beyond reading about concepts and instead engage with them at a deeper level. Further, they must create personal care routines, self-management systems, and basic study habits and then reflect on these experiences every day to solidify their learning and growth. When educated in this way students gain more than basic skills, they gain confidence and personal learning that are necessary for success.

Cost $25

 

See you next week!!

-Your Conference Steering Committee

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